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Name: Anwar Uddin
Current Club: Eastbourne Borough
Previous Clubs: West Ham United, Sheffield Wednesday, Barnet, Bristol Rovers
ZRF Role: Coach / Mentor

 

Biography

Uddin began his football career at West Ham United, working his way up through their youth and reserve teams where he was captain. He was in West Ham's victorious 1999 FA Youth Cup winning squad that defeated Coventry City. Uddin later signed for Dagenham & Redbridge during the summer of 2004 after leaving Bristol Rovers. He became the captain of the team. Uddin was part of the first handful of professional British Asians to play in the Football League. In June 2010, Uddin left Dagenham to sign for League Two club Barnet and he was appointed captain ahead of the 2010–11 season. In 2011, following the departure of manager Martin Allen, Uddin was appointed as caretaker assistant-manager to Giuliano Grazioli at Barnet making him the first ever British-Asian to take up a coaching position in English football. 

How did you get into playing and coaching?

Football is all I ever wanted to do and I worked hard to become the best I can be to fulfil my dream and enjoy an adventurous carreer. With fantastic highs and dissapointing lows and having played for clubs from the premiere league down to the conference, I feel a have a huge amount of experience along with my unique story to share. Having worked with the best players in the world on a daily basis and under the guidance of fantastic managers I now have a thirst for coaching. This is one of the reasons why I created academies in Bangladesh and in London. I now coach within all my projects and having been appointed Barnet FC assistant manager for for a short period of time I enjoy coaching at both youth and senior level.

What does a typical week involve?

Working with professional players and scholars and also teachers and school kids about conduct, racism and equality. This takes me all over the country and as well as this I have to train with my club and be prepared to play on a Tuesday and Saturday. Thursdays are taken up by my academy in East London in which I coach and oversee the whole programme. I always make time for my family so a typical week will always be a busy one. 

What advice would you give to an aspiring coaches looking to get into the game?

I think it's really important you know your stuff and take time to learn from the more experienced coache and take from them what you agree with and believe will enhance you as an individual. It is also important be confident as a coach as young people will look up to you as a role model and hang on your every word and direction so be positive, enthusiastic, and competent.